St Mark's, CA
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St Mark's Church, Berkeley, CA
Choir Director George Emblom
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Salisbury                       A town where there is no need to go looking for interests in dark corners, it is all around.  The city dates back to the 13th Century when it was decided to move the Bishops seat  from Old Sarum.  The Cathedral foundations were begun in 1220 and the city started to grow.  Salisbury was built on a grid or chequer system which left space between the blocks.  Cathedral close is the most beautiful in all England and the list of buildings with interest is unending.  The first sight of the Cathedral is most impressive an early example of English architecture.  Its spire soaring to a height of 404ft the highest in England, the nave measures 198ft with a clear uncluttered beauty, little having changed since it was built.
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Salisbury Cathedral          The first sight of the Cathedral is most impressive an early example of English architecture.  Its spire soaring to a height of 404ft the highest in England which imposes almost 6,000 tons of stone on the four pillars of the crossing.  The Nave measures 198ft with a clear uncluttered beauty, little having changed since it was built.  Foundations no more than 4 feet deep on a bed of gravel, the main building was begun in 1220 and completed in 1258.  The Cloisters and Chapter house being finished in 1280.  It was never a Monastic institution but staffed with Secular Clergy called Canons.  This arrangements continues today.  Canons would be away in their parishes for most of the year, just coming back to the Cathedral for short periods of time.  The present houses round the close are built on the sites of the former Canons Houses.
It is interesting to note that the main wall round the Cathedral close was granted by licence from Cdward III and is reputed to be built from stone from the original Cathedral at Old Sarum started in 1075

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Wells                            Very much a Cathedral city and dominated by it, the existing building was started in 1180 continued in stages until 1424.  Many of the buildings in the Cathedral precincts are used today for much the same purposes as that for which they were originally built.  The Vicars Close consists of a cobbled street with a total of 42 small houses built in the 14th Century for the Vicars of the Cathedral.  The Cathedral school was started in 909 and while closing for one short period of 6 years in 1861 now records over 600 pupils.  On the West front there are 294 sculptures left of the original 386 some damaged beyond recognition, 3 new ones were unveiled by the Prince of Wales in 1985.  The Chapter House reached by an ancient stone stairway is octagonal in shape and part of a two storey building, could be one of the most beautiful Chapter Houses in Britain.  The Cathedrals South doors lead to beautiful 15/16th Century cloisters
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Winchester                    The historic city of Winchester has been welcoming groups for centuries, ever since the first pilgrims visited the shrine of St Wwithun.  Already an important town in Roman times, it became the capital under the Anglo Saxons, and in Alfreds time 871-901 was a great centre of learning.  William the Conqueror kept Winchester as his capital and as late as the 17th Century Charles II planned a palace here.  The city is rich in important buildings, one such building is the Great Hall, completed in 1235 it is a magnificent example of 13th Century domestic architecture.  It is now an Assize Court. Sir Walter Raleigh was condemned to death here in 1603 and on the wall hangs what is called King Arthurs Round Table, marked out and inscribed for his knights.  However one building stands out above all others, the cathedral.
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Winchester Cathedral     The building was started in 1079 and consecrated in 1093.  Work from this period can still be seen in the crypt, transepts and east part of the cloister.  Between 1189 and 1204 the lady chapel was built and the choir extended.  It is the longest Medieval Cathedral in Europe (556ft) in 1110 the central tower collapsed and was rebuilt with the supporting piers greatly strengthened (they are now 20ft in width). Among its treasures is the Great Winchester Bible dating back to the 12th Century, this illuminated copy was written in the scriptorium at Winchester and is now preserved in the Cathedral library.
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Romsey                         Like most Abbey towns Romsey grew up around the ecclesiastical site.  King John`s hunting box over the centuries has at various times been, abbey guest house, cottages and even a workhouse.  It is a flint and stone house and was only rediscovered during the early part of this century.  It is widely accepted that Edward I visited with attendants during the year 1301.  Evidence has been found scratched in the plasterwork of the upper rooms, of various heads, shields and mottoes associated with noblemen of the day, together with a life-size drawing of the King himself, resplendent in crown.  It is also recorded that King John had sent his daughter here to be educated just over a century before the visit of King Edward.
Romsey - means “Rums Island” it is thought that the island referred to is the somewhat higher ground situated away from the river around the Abbey where the town arose in the 10th Century.  The name was recorded in the mid 10th Century as “romeseye”.
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Romsey Abbey                   The Abbey dates back to the start of the 10th century.  Anglo-Saxon foundations have in fact been discovered. (a trapdoor exists to access the remains from the church).  The main building however does date back to the 12th Century built by Henry de Blois, Bishop of Winchester.  The church was actually sold to the town for £100 during the dissolution.  With the exception of the West front the Abbey is entirely 12th Century.  The Norman nave is over 250ft long and soars to a height of over 70ft.  Some very interesting items are to be seen within the walls, especially at the rear of the altar in the South choir aisle, where you can see a small Anglo-Saxon rood showing Christ with angels and soldiers.  Also on the West wall of the South transept hangs a crucifixion with the hand of god reaching down, it is verified that this also dates back to Anglo-Saxon times.  A delightful Abbey which cannot fail to inspire and enthuse one.
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Stonehenge                  There is nothing quite like this awe inspiring monument anywhere else in the world, yet at first sight it is curiously disappointing, probably because it is set on a plain so vast that in comparison the stones seem quite insignificant.  It is only when man stands close to the stones that he seems so puny in comparison and it is hard to imagine how centuries ago, with only primitive tools to help them, men could possibly have placed these huge boulders into position.
The actual building falls into three phases.  Phase one which took place in the late Neolithic period somewhere around 2,000 years B.C. but little is known of this work.  Phase two which took place between 1,700 and 1,600 B.C. we do know at this point about 80 blue stones, brought over by sea from the Prescelly mountains in Pembrokeshire, Wales, were place in two concentric circles with the entrance at the N.E. this work was never finished.  Phase three which took place between 1,600 and 1,300 B.C. during the Bronze age at this time the blue stones were moved and about 80 enormous Sarsen stones were dragged here from the Marlborough downs.  The whole history of Stonehenge covers the period from about 2,200 B.C.. to 1,300 B.C. but exactly why it was built remains a mystery.  One fact remains the axis of Stonehenge was carefully aligned with the sunrise on 21st June, the longest day of the year, and was it built in order to calculate the annual calendar of the seasons?
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Old Sarum                         Such a historic place covering an area of approx 56 acres. Important due to its prominence above the countryside below.  First remains indicate a Iron age camp, followed by the Romans, the Anglo-Saxons, then the Danes who pillaged the area in 1003.  In 1070 William the Conqueror reviewed his troops on the plains below.  The site really moved forward just after William departed.  The Episcopal See was moved from Sherborne to Sarum and a new Cathedral and Castle where built on the site.  However by 1220 the area was becoming too small for the requirements of the community so a new Cathedral was planned nearby.(New Sarum or as it later became Salisbury) stones from the old Cathedral where carried away and used in the construction of the new Cathedral. 
Old Sarum---old refers to a former Iron age fort and Sarum is the abbreviated form of the Latin name
Salisbury
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Truro                            Capital city of Cornwall, the commercial hub of the area.  During the Middle ages it was an important port for the export of iron ore, it is now a market town and an administrative centre for the county.  Stood for the King during the Civil War but really history has passed it by.
Truro-:
considered to be based on the Cornish words Try meaning triple and Erow meaning unit of land the name was first recorded as Triueru in a document of 1176. 
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Truro Cathedral     Although by our standards a modern Cathedral dedicated in 1910.  No one can fail to be impressed when approaching the city, a soaring spire 250ft catching the eye and dominating the centre of the city.  It was the first Anglican Cathedral to be built on a new site in this country since Salisbury in the 13th Century.  The County of Cornwall had been an Archdeaconry of Exeter until the decision taken on the 15th December 1876 which declared the See founded at Truro.  The first bishop was Edward Benson Enthoned in 1877.  Not in a Cathedral but in the small parish church of St Mary the Virgin.  The foundation stone of the new Cathedral was laid on the 20th May 1880 by the then Prince of Wales later to become King Edward VII.  The building was completed and dedicated in 1910.
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St. Mawes                   Beautifully situated on the Cornish South coast, at the Eastern side of the entrance to the Carrick Roads.  The name of the town derives from that of its patron, Saint Mawdeth, a rather obscure Celtic Monk.  The church is mentioned in a document of 1345 as being dedicated to Sanctus Maudetus.  There are several thatched houses on the waterfront overlooking the bay, behind the quay the narrow streets rise steeply, with fine views over the river. 
St Mawes: derived from the name of its Patron Saint Mawdeth, a rather obscure Celtic Monk. Recorded in a document of 1345 as Sanctus Maudetus
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St. Michaels Mount   At high tide it must be reached by boat. At low tide it is possible to walk across the causeway and up its steep cobbled pathway to its battlements.  At some time in the past it was joined to the mainland.  Takes its name from the dedication of its Chapel to St Michael the Archangel.  In the Doomsday book it was recorded as Sanctus Michael.  According to an old Cornish legend, St Michael appeared to some fishermen on the Western side of the island in about 500AD  In 1044 a Benedictine Monastery was founded on it.  Then owned by the Monks of Mont St Michel off Brittany in France, to which it bears a striking resemblance.  In 1425 the crown ejected the Monks and it became a fortress due to its strategic location.  It then passed from noble to noble until 1657 when the St Aubyn family bought it.  It remained as the family home until 1954 when the national trust acquired the land.  A population of approx 40/50 people still live on the island, mainly around the waters edge in a Harbourside community.  The church is of particular interest being of 14th Century origin with a fine North door.
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Trelissick Gardens   25 acres of garden set in parkland overlooking the Fal River, Carrick Roads and the harbour.  The property offers a port of call of exceptional beauty for general and specialist visitors in a county already remarkable for its breathtaking coastal landscapes.
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Falmouth           Magnificent setting, its harbour is claimed to be the third largest natural one in the world.  It also claims to have the most temperate climate of any resort in the UK.  Sir Walter Raleigh landed here in 1590, however it did not become a parish till 1664 and not till 1670 did it have a quay.  Truro and Penryn being the more important ports.  However the coming of the larger ships gave the town its chance, in 1688 it was chosen as the mail packet station and by 1827, 39 ships where delivering letters all over the world.  The arrival of the steamships heralded the decline in Falmouths fortune but in 1863 the first tourists discovered this jewel in the South West.  Still a busy port servicing large tankers up to 90,000 tons and many smaller vessels tie up in the multitude of small creeks that run off the Fal Estuary.  A very important embarkation area for ships heading off to France on D-Day 6th June 1944.  Plenty of places to eat with many old pubs backing onto the main street which runs parallel to the main quay.
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