East Anglia
Up

Up
London
South West
South East
Southern
Wales
Cotswolds
Midlands
East Anglia
North West
Lake District
Northumbria
Yorkshire
Lincolnshire
Scotland

 

 

American War Cemetery    Commemorating the brave American servicemen who gave their lives during the Second World War to help keep this island and the rest of the world free.  8,312 are buried here together with a memorial to the 5,126 missing in action.  Never let us forget their help and ultimate sacrifice in helping to keep our island home free from those across the water who wish to subjugate us into their world which we are not part.  Their sacrifice must be a lesson to us all to never drop our guard, no matter how sweet the music sounds.
Web Link

Aylsham & Wroxham          Aylesham is a small very attractive Norfolk market town situated alongside the River Bure.  The unspoilt medieval market place is surrounded by 17th & 18th Century buildings, notably the Black Boy Inn, The Knoll and The Manor House all circa 17th Century.  The church of St Michael`s (decorated and perpendicular) dates back to the 14/15th Century with a two story porch built in 1488.  The church is said to have connections with John of Gaunt whose arms are clearly seen on the shaft of the 15th century church font.
Wroxham is a yachting centre which has grown up each side of the River Bure.  The first bridge to span the river at this point was built in 1614.  Wroxham Broad is extremely popular and is the headquarters of the Norfolk Brords Yacht Club.

Burghley House                   The largest & grandest house of the first Elizabethan age. built between 1565 & 1587 by William Cecil.  The house is still a family home yet full of superb paintings and antiques, a treasure to feast upon.  The art collection is one of the most impressive 17th Century Italian painting collections in the world, with over 300 great works on display in the state rooms, which also includes work by Gainsborough, Kneller and Lawrence.  The tour will allow access to over 18 state rooms filled with superb porcelain from all over Europe and a collection of early Japanese ceramics, together with furniture of the highest quality including a bed once used by Queen Victoria.  Try and find time to wander in the grounds, acres of park land, originally landscaped by Capability Brown.  Mature trees and plenty of space for the youngsters to let off some steam.
Web Link

Bury St. Edmonds               A Cathedral town and county town of West Suffolk. commemorates two outstanding episodes in its history.  Edmund last king of East Anglia was killed in 869 by the Danes, the English at that time held that his death was a martydom and for many years he was Patron Saint of England.  His remains were taken to Beadriceswyrth which from the 11th Century was called St Edmunsbury.  In 1020 Cnut having become King of England and hoping to resolve discord between the English and Danish communities gave the place where Edmund was buried the status of Abbey.  The second great episode to effect the community took place in 1215 on November 20th, when the Barons took an oath at the alter of St Edmund to get ratification of the Magna Carta from the then King John.  Bury is certainly a town to walk in with interesting churches, old buildings, a 13th Century Guildhall etc.  The Cathedral Church since 1914 has been St James, a 16th Century building with some 19th Century additions.  What remains of the great Abbey church which at one time was 500ft long with a West front nearly 250ft wide is all but hidden away and just small fragments are visible at various places like the Norman Gate and Abbey Gate.  Bury St Edmunds means The Olde English Bury is Burg meaning fort or town.  St Edmund refers to the Saint.  Originally Beadriceswyrth meaning Beaduric`s Enclosure.  Which referred to a small monastic community established to safeguard the Saints remains.  In 1083 this was thus recorded as Sancte Eadmundes  Byrig.  Which over time became turned round to become Bury St Edmunds.
Web Link

Cambridge                             Cambridge is one of the most important and beautiful towns not only in East Anglia, but also in Britain and even Europe.  The quality of its buildings in particular those belonging to the University and the particular atmosphere caused by the felicitous combination of river and gardens have given the city a place in the itinerary of every visitor to this country.  The history of Cambridge began many hundreds of years before the first college was founded, a Celtic settlement had arise on Castle Hill 100 years prior to the Roman conquest.  At the foot of the hill was a ford across the River Cam.  It is thought the Romans built a bridge here.  The site of Cambridge became of great strategic and commercial importance.  With the departure of the Romans the town continued to spread to its present position on the East Anglian side of the river.  The coming of the Normans only increased expansion they even rebuilt the Castle.  Then in the 13th Century saw the founding of the first Cambridge College, Peterhouse College, established in 1281 by the Bishop of Ely and moving to its own hostels in 1284.  So was established the first College and the consequent increase in the importance of the city as a seat of learning and a centre of communal life.
Web Link

Chelmsford                            The county town of Essex. has been an important thoroughfare town since Roman times due its excellent logistical placing on the Rivers Chelmer & Can together with a strategic site on the main road from London to other major towns in East Anglia.  The existing town is built on the site of a very early Roman settlement called ”Caesaromagus” `Ceasar`s market.  An important market town it as now grown in size to a thriving commercial centre.  Chelmsford- appears in the doomsday book as “Celmeresfort” which means “ceolmaers ford” most likely referring to a ford over the nearby Chelmer river.

Duxford                                   Europe’s top aviation museum located at a former R.A.F. Battle of Britain fighter station.  Over 140 historic aircraft from the First World War up to the present day including the recently opened American museum.
Web Link

Ely                                            The Town stands above the River Ouse on a bluff which was formerly an island, accessible only by boat or causeway until the fens were drained in the 17th and 18th Century.  It was the scene of Hereward`s resistance to William the Conqueror.  A quiet oasis away from the hustle and bustle of modern city life around the precints of the cathedral are the houses of the Kings School founded by Henry VIII.  Nearby is the Bishops Palace and St Mary`s church, in the vicarage of which lived Oliver Cromwell and his family from 1636-1647.
Web Link

Flag Fen                                  The only Bronze age timbers visible any where in Europe.  See and feel timbers recently exposed after 3,000 years.   A reconstructed prehistoric village.  A roman road discovered where it was built, still with its original surface.  The oldest wheel in England.  Visit the on going excavations and see the archaeologists working on the dig.  The museum showing the finds, jewellery, weapons etc.
Web Link

Great Yarmouth                     Yarmouth owes much to its unique position, where three rivers, the Bure, Waveney & Yare converge on their way into the north sea.  In Anglo Saxon times it was actually an island, a large sandbank dotted with fisherman's cottages.  Over the years the land has gradually built up to form a promontory. 
The Seaward Side now a 5 mile stretch of sandy beache, amusements and a breezy promenade feeds two fine old traditional piers, Britannia pier (800ft in length) & Wellington (600ft in length). 
The Westward Side contains most of the towns older buildings.  It is in this area you will find the quay, a mile in length and sometimes as much as 150ft wide.  Behind the South quay is the rows, a medieval network of courtyards and narrow alleyways, much damaged during the bombing raids of 1942.  St Nicholas church also badly damaged during the war was completely restored in the late 1950s to its present state now described as the largest parish church in England.  Just off market place to the South of the church is a half timbered Medieval house built in 1641.  Anna Sewell the author of black beauty was born in the town in 1820 and lived in this house for many years.  Great Yarmouth was granted its royal charter by King John in 1208.  Remains of the original Medieval walls can still be seen.  Within the walls various religious orders such as Benedictines, Carmelites, Dominicans & Franciscans set up houses of help and order within a complex system of narrow streets.  During the 18th Century the town became fashionable as a seaside resort which continued well into the 19th Century.  Once renowned as a major fishing port, now as the dependence on fishing has decreased oil and gas exploration have taken over to keep the good economic health of the area moving into the 21st Century.
 
Web Link

Huntingdon                            A very attractive small market town built around the narrow main street which stretches snake like for over one and a half miles.  Definitely Roman connections, many Roman coins have been found here.  The Anglo Saxons created it as Burgh and the Danes invaded the town in 921.  During the 13th Century the town had 16 churches but was devastated by the black death in 1348.  Very much an agricultural based economy as one would expect in such a beautiful area.  Oliver Cromwell was born in the town and attended the same school as Samuel Pepys (now a museum), the building was originally the hospital of St John the Baptist founded approx 1160, considerable parts of the old structure still remain.  Two very interesting Inns “The George” (17th Century) with a fine open courtyard and  “The Falcon” with oriel windows and a massive door, which is believed to have been the headquarters of Cromwell during the Civil War.  At the far end of town a 14th Century bridge separates the town from Godmanchester, said by many to be one the finest surviving Medieval bridges in the country.  The town comprises of many 16th/17th Century buildings well worth an evenings exploration.
Huntingdon - probably means huntsman’s hill.  The earliest recorded name was “Huntandun” in a document of 973.  In 1011 we have “Huntadunscir” the actual Olde English word for huntsman was “hunta”.
Web Link

Ickworth House                    Now in the hands of the National Trust.  Ickworth has had a chequered life since its design in 1795 by the Eccentric 4th Earl of Bristol.  Today visitors can see fine furniture, a superb painting collection and possibly the finest collection of Georgian silver anywhere in Britain.  The architecture is different and the rotunda is without doubt a special feature of the design.  Deer are kept in the lovely grounds that surround the house.
Web Link

Lavenham                              This beautiful small village developed through the rise of the cloth trade before and after the 15th Century.  The domestic architecture of Lavenham includes the Guildhall, erected shortly after the founding of the Guild of Corpus Christi in 1529.  A superb timber framed building, one of its corner posts carries a full length figure of the founder of the Guild the 15th Lord De Vere, the old wool hall, Tudor shops, the De Vere House, the hotel (originally 3 cottages) and several of the houses in church street, the pargeting on the facades and the timbering, make the whole atmosphere of Lavenham unique.  The church of St Peter and Paul dates back several hundred years.  The wood carving inside the church probably by Flemish craftsmen dates back to the 16th Century and the misericords decorated with fantastic medieval imagery are probably some of the best examples in Britain.  The bells of the church are also famous, one of them, the tenor bell made in 1625 by Miles Graye of Colchester is reputed to be the finest toned tenor bell in England if not the world.
Web Link

Norfolk lavender farm            Caley Mill the headquarters of Norfolk Lavender.  Originally a water mill for grinding corn. Built of local stone in the early Ninteenth Century it is now surrounded by gardens of lavender, roses & herbs. The national collection of lavenders is also kept here.  Each variety has its own bed with over 50 different lavenders to see.  Harvesting takes place during July & August and it is at this time visitors are taken round the distillery where they can see the ancient process of extracting the drops of lavender oil contained in each small floret.
Web Link

Norwich                                  A beautiful city and the Capital of Norfolk.  The site of the city so important as it developed within a large double bend in the River Wensum.  After the Norman conquest both the castle and the cathedral were built, two focal points that remain until this day.  The great stone keep of the castle dates back to 1160 and except for the Tower of London must rate as one of the best surviving examples of Norman military architecture in the country.  90 feet square and over 70 feet in height.  The city centre is dotted with important historic buildings, the Guildhall built between 1407-1413, the Assembly House in Theatre Street 1754, Bridewell Museum 1370, Strangers Hall is Mid 15th Century, plus approximately 30 surviving churches all Medieval and many of exceptional interest.  In Medieval times Norwich also had one of the largest Jewish communities in England.  Wealthy merchants and money lenders living in the city built superb houses some of which exist to this day, one example being the old music house in King Street which is 12th Century.  Norwich-the place name means Northern specialised place with the Olde English wic meaning town or port. the town was recorded as Northwic during the early part of the 10th Century.  In the Doomsday book it is recorded as Noruic.
Web Link

Peterborough                       A prosperous city and an important market town.  In its centre is the market place where the Guildhall, built in 1671, dominates.  Nearby is St John the Baptist’s Church built in 1402.  The best Georgian houses are in Priestgate on the corner of which is the three storied Angel Hotel.  The Town Hall in Bridge Street was built in the 1930s in a mock Georgian style.
Peterborough: first mentioned in a document of 750 as Medeshamstedi Anglos Saxon settlement probably meaning homestead by the whirlpool.  Two hundred years later the settlement was destroyed by the Danes but was rebuilt in the 10th Century.  In the Doomsday book the place was simply known as Burg.  However a document of the 12th Century defines the name as Medeshamstede qui Modo Burgdicitur (taking the meaning to be Medeshampstead which is now only called Buirg) by 1333 the city became known as “petreburgh” 
Web Link to Peterborough Diocese

Sandringham                        Sandringham House is the family residence of the Royal Family.  The estate was purchased by the then Prince of Wales in 1862.  The 18th Century house was elaborately refurbished by the Prince who later became Edward VII.  It now retains an appropiate Edwardian atmosphere.  The estates are extensive and include several villages, farms and woodlands which are managed on behalf of the family.  By tradition it is to this very quiet place that the family comes each Christmas.  King George V died here in 1936 and King George VI (Queen Elizabeth's father) died here in 1952.  It is also recorded that King George VI was born and baptised here.
Web Link

St Wendreda`s Church     March          Built around the mid 1300s. Quite an history surrounds the Saint.  Her   father was King Anna a 7th Century ruler in Saxon East England.  She had a love of solitude.  When she died her body was laid to rest at March where she had spent her final years.  Then the body was moved to Ely.  In 1016 the body was dug up again and carried by the Saxon soldiers in their battle against the Danes. The Saxons were defeated and the body came into the hands of the Danish King Canute.  He was supposedly so moved by her life of piety that he presented the body to Canterbury, where she stayed for the next 300 years.  In 1343 she came back to March where she was buried in the newly refurbished church.  This church no longer remains. Although the tower was built in the second half of the 14th Century.  The church is renown for its superb, quite breathtaking double hammer beam angel roof. Experts say the finest in the country possibly in Europe.  There are 118 angels in all, some half life size. All carved from English Oak.  Nothing so glorious was ever created again in a parish church, possibly due to the reformation or more likely because a double hammer beam roof is not thought to be that robust of structures. In fact the carpenters that built this roof probably already new that.  You can see the iron rods wisely added to the structure to help brace against the outward pressures that must eventually push against it.  For five Centuries it has stood the elements, pressures and everything mankind can think up. Carpenters of the 15/16th Centuries, well done.
Web Link

The National Stud, Newmarket        Over 500 acres of grounds transformed into one of the most prestigious studs in the country and opened by the Queen in 1967.  The stud has a stallion unit, nursery yards and special paddocks for the mares and foals, so they may stay together for the first few months after birth.
Web Link

West Stow                              An original Anglo-Saxon village was discovered and excavated on this site just a few years ago.  Rather than just leave the excavations fill in the holes etc. it was decided to reconstruct a village literally on the foundations of the original buildings.  This unique experiment was carried out using the same materials, replica implements and construction methods first used over 1200 years ago.  A visit to the village provides the opportunity to study aspects of early Anglo-Saxon village life, step back in time to a way of living 1200 years ago into the reconstruction of one family unit, a hall, houses and workshops including a farm project with livestock and crops.
Web Link