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Dallas, TX
Dr Cheryl White
St Pauls NY
St Philips FL
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St Peters NY
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Christ Church, OH
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Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas, MO
Choral Director John Schaefer
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Bristol                 Once one of the most important ports in the country, the earliest records of its commercial activity going back to Edward II in the 10th Century when silver coins were minted here.  All this due to the fact that the River Severn and Avon was navigable to this point.  It was from Bristol in 1497 that John Cabot and his Bristol born son Sebastian set sail with 18 sailors in the 100 ton ship “Matthew” before reaching the mainland of America in Newfoundland.  A centre for trade and commerce for over 1,000 years, the city still has much to offer and although the large container ships now dock at the entrance to the Avon Gorge at Avonmouth, much activity still remains around the old dock side area.
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Bristol Cathedral                Formerly an Augustinian Abbey founded in 1142 by Robert Fitzharding.  In 1542 it became the Cathedral Church of the newly formed Diocese of Bristol.  It still retains much of its Norman solidarity, particularly the fine Chapter House.  The Church building is known as a “Hall Church” type where high Chancel, aisles and an Eastern Lady Chapel are of equal height.  The Choir is full of absolutely fine woodwork dating back to the 1500s and the Misericords of great interest depicting as they do Biblical scenes.  The organ was built in 1685 by Renatus Harris and all the pipework is original.  Grinling Gibbons created the superb organ case. Choristers are educated at the adjoining Cathedral school.  One important feature in the Berkeley Chapel: a Medieval candelabrum (understood to be the only one of its kind in England recorded) has being given to the Temple Church in Bristol during 1450 and passed on to its present home during the terrible blitz of World War Two.
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St Mary Redcliffe
A superb example of medieval architecture and once described by Queen Elizabeth 1st on a visit to Bristol as “the fairest, goodliest and most famous parish church in the Kingdom” in all respects it is the size of a Cathedral with a 240ft Nave and a spire added in the 19th century rising 285ft from street level.
The church owes much of its construction to William Canynge in the 14th Century and further work completed by his son.
Admiral Sir William Penn whose son, also a William, founded Pennsylvania is buried in the South Transept. The close links with the United States are further strengthened by the restoration of the St John`s Chapel by the friends of St Mary Redcliffe in America.
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Exeter                 Founded by the Romans in 50A.D. who surrounded the town with a great red stone wall, some parts which can still be seen today.  Under the Anglo Saxons it became a very important place and was twice ravaged by the Danes once in 876 when they occupied the town for three years and again in 1003. Following on after the Norman invasion the town held out till 1068 before finally accepting defeat after an 18 day siege by William the Conqueror.  The town was an important cloth manufacturing area and because of its strategic position close to the coast trading centre right up to the late 18th Century.  Two attractive areas in the city are the Cathedral Close and the area of the quay.  Some Medieval pubs still remain, The Ship, White Hart, Turks Head together with some fine timbered buildings.  Much however was lost in the German bombing of 1942 which flattened a great deal of the city.
Exeter-:derives its name from the River Exe on which it stands and could be conceived as the Roman Exchester the latter half indicating a Roman camp called Isca Dumnomiorum—Isca meaning Exe and Dumnomiorum being the name of the tribe of people who could be called the people of Devon.  The name was first recorded in 894 as Exanceaster and later in the Doomsday book with a Norman influence as Essecestra
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Exeter Cathedral                 It is recorded that a church with a religious community probably existed here from as early as the 7th Century and St Boniface an apostle from Germany was educated here.  It became the seat of the Bishop in 1050 when Leofric made the Minster his Cathedral.  Leofric founded a community of 24 Canons whose successors have run the Cathedral ever since.  The original Cathedral was built in the Norman style and consecrated on the 21st November 1133.  It is believed the Cathedral had boy singers by 1180 and the office of Dean founded in 1225.  During the period 1258-80 a new rebuilding scheme was started which built on the existing Norman foundations and by the 14th Century only the Norman towers remained of the original building.  Little disturbance was made until the exterior was extensively restored in the 19th Century and changes made inside during the period 1870-1877.   The building did take a direct hit during the bombing of 1942 and much damage was done.  The Quire screen is original dating back to 1320 and the Quire has furnishings (Bishops throne nearly 60ft high dating back to the period of Bishop Stapledon (1308-1326) Music plays a very important part in Cathedral life and the Choristers are educated in the school which dates back to the Cathedrals very early days.
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Wells                            Very much a Cathedral city and dominated by it, the existing building was started in 1180 continued in stages until 1424.  Many of the buildings in the Cathedral precincts are used today for much the same purposes as that for which they were originally built.  The Vicars Close consists of a cobbled street with a total of 42 small houses built in the 14th Century for the Vicars of the Cathedral.  The Cathedral school was started in 909 and while closing for one short period of 6 years in 1861 now records over 600 pupils.  On the West front there are 294 sculptures left of the original 386 some damaged beyond recognition, 3 new ones were unveiled by the Prince of Wales in 1985.  The Chapter House reached by an ancient stone stairway is octagonal in shape and part of a two storey building, could be one of the most beautiful Chapter Houses in Britain.  The Cathedrals South doors lead to beautiful 15/16th Century cloisters
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Worcester                         Worcester a city with a river, cathedral, famous pottery and history around every corner.  Situated in the centre of the county and built on the banks of the River Severn.  The area has known many marauding armies using the town as a base and river crossing.  Romans, Anglo Saxons, Danes and the Welsh have all contributed to its colourful history.  The Civil War inflicted  terrible damage, it was the first city to declare for the King and the last to surrender in 1646.  It also saw in 1651 the final battle for Cromwell when Charles I was completely defeated.  The Cathedral was started in 1084 and is a beautiful place of worship.  Many interesting houses are situated in the city some dating back over 500 years, however today the cities main claim to fame must surely be the home of the Royal Worcester Porcelain works situated near the Cathedral right in the centre of the city.
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Web Link to Worcester Diocese

Worcester Cathedral         Worcester received it first Bishop-Bishop Bosel in 680.  It is thought the first Cathedral stood very close the present one.  We do understand that Bishop Oswald built a new Cathedral in 962 and it is thought that some of the existing stonework is incorporated in the present building.  In 1084 Bishop Wulstan started the building of a new Church on the present site.  The crypt and chapter house remain substantially as the Norman builders left them.  King John visited many times and asked that on his death he be buried in the Cathedral which was agreed.  The new Cathedral was consecrated in 1218 but further enlargement followed ending in about 1375.  From 960 to 1540 the Cathedral was a Monastery under the rule of the Benedictine order. One interesting point the whole length of the Cathedral seems to be built in one piece when in fact the two West bays are Norman and the North side built in 1345 is far better finished than the South side which due to the intervention of the Black Death was built some 40 years later. 
Interesting history items.
 For 500 years pilgrims came to visit the shrines of St Oswald & St Wulstan here in Worcester.  From the great Cathedral tower Charles II saw his troops routed in the last great battle of the Civil War.  Today Worcester together with Hereford & Gloucester host the world famous Three Choirs Festival of music.
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Ludlow                            The castle was built in 1085 by either the Earl of Shrewsbury Robert Montgomery or Roger De Lacy.  Built to ward off those marauding Welsh natives.  The massive structure stands today much as it did when it was built and seen by Edward IV, Catherine of Aragon and Henry VIII's brother Prince Arthur who died here.  The massive structure stands today much as it did when it was built and seen by Edward IV, Catherine of Aragon and Henry VIII's brother Prince Arthur who died here.  The parish Church of St Laurence is one of the largest parish Churches in England.  Largely 15th Century. Interesting Misericords in the church choir.  The East window in the Chancel is 30ft high by 18ft wide and depicts the life, history and miracles of the patron Saint in 27 separate scenes containing approx 300 figures.  The finest thoroughfare in Ludlow is broad street where every building dates back to the 14/15th Centuries.  Tucked into a yard off Church Street is the Rose and Crown first licensed in the 16th century.  The Feathers Hotel in the bull ring is a lovely 17th Century half timbered building. it is believed the entrance door is more than 300 years old.  Few towns in England have as much to show for their history as Ludlow.  Enjoy it in the time you have.
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Tintern                             Large impressive Cistercian Abbey in beautiful riverside location in the Wye valley.  It has been the subject of a poem by Wordsworth and a painting by Turner.  The order was founded in 1131 by Walter de Clare.  Little is left of the original building, it was built here deliberately, in keeping with the strictness and austerity of the order.  The abbey was completely rebuilt in the 13th Century and in 1326 Edward II stayed here for 2 nights.  The Abbey continued to be active and generally undisturbed until the dissolution in 1536.   From then on the Abbey became neglected and fell into disrepair.  Greatly regarded by the romantic movement in the late 18th Century for its peace and tranquillity.
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Cardiff                             The capital city of Wales boasts a castle with 1,900 years of history first built by the Romans, some of the 10ft thick walls still remain.  The Normans came and built their castle which has been in continuous occupation ever since.  Some of the area surrounding the castle is now occupied by a superb modern shopping centre.  Hundreds of acres of parkland situated right in the city centre, museums, the civic centre, University of Wales. St Davids Hall, a 2,000 seat concert and conference centre.  To take the city into the millennium the new Cardiff Bay project, a redevelopment of the old Cardiff docks area.
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Haw Bridge Inn                Built in 1630 as a stop over place for boats, where the old toll bridge crossed the river Severn.  Many a boatman has taken a sip of ale and a Ploughman’s lunch within these walls, while watching the boats plying their trade on this once busy stretch of river.  Today, just pleasure craft glide slowly by. But the Inn still retains the ambiance of a bygone age nestling as it does on the banks of the river.  Flagstone floors, oak panelling & oak beamed ceilings.  Collections of horse brasses and Toby jugs adorn both walls and ceilings.  Home cooked food, enjoy this little piece of real England.
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