St John, VA
Up

Up
St James, MD
1st Congregational
Grace Church, NJ
St Peters, NC
Holy Innocents, GA
Holy Comforter, NC
Nativity, AL
Cheryl White
Christ Church, Ill
St Marks, OH
Holy Spirit, PA
St John, VA

 

 

St Johns Episcopal Church, Lynchburg, VA
Choir Director Peggy Howell
Web Link

Windsor                                Dominated both in spirit and in fact, by its magnificent castle, yet the town itself is very attractive with Georgian and Victorian buildings, Church Street being one of its prettiest areas.  The parish Church of St John stands in the High Street with railings designed by Grindling Gibbons.  Nearby is the Guildhall designed at the end of the 17th Century by Sir Thomas Fitch and finished by Sir Christopher Wren.  However it is the castle that made the town and still attracts thousands and thousands of visitors every year.
Web Link

Windsor Castle                   The castle is the largest inhabited castle in the world and covers over 13 acres.  Its story starts with William the Conqueror who quickly grasped its strategic position and the advantage of a forest for hunting close by.  Since then practically every sovereign has had a hand in the building, Henry II put up the first stone buildings including the round tower, but the defences are still those built by Henry III. Edward III was born at Windsor and loved it, he enlarged the royal apartments and founded the order of the Knights of the Garter, making Windsor a centre for chivalry.  The castle is made up of three parts, the lower ward, which includes St George's chapel, the upper ward in which lie the state apartments and the middle ward where the enormous round tower gives wonderful views over 12 counties.
Web Link

St. Georges Chapel, Windsor    A sumptuous and impressive building which yet gives an effect of light and spaciousness.  The perpendicular chapel was begun by Edward IV in 1475 and completed in the reigns of Henry VII and VIII.  Many sovereigns and famous men and women lie buried here, including Charles I, Henry VIII, Jane Seymour and the present Queens Mother and father.  Queen Victoria and her husband Prince Albert were also buried at Windsor but in the royal mausoleum at Frogmore in Home Park near the castle.
Web Link

Wells                            Very much a Cathedral city and dominated by it, the existing building was started in 1180 continued in stages until 1424.  Many of the buildings in the Cathedral precincts are used today for much the same purposes as that for which they were originally built.  The Vicars Close consists of a cobbled street with a total of 42 small houses built in the 14th Century for the Vicars of the Cathedral.  The Cathedral school was started in 909 and while closing for one short period of 6 years in 1861 now records over 600 pupils.  On the West front there are 294 sculptures left of the original 386 some damaged beyond recognition, 3 new ones were unveiled by the Prince of Wales in 1985.  The Chapter House reached by an ancient stone stairway is octagonal in shape and part of a two storey building, could be one of the most beautiful Chapter Houses in Britain.  The Cathedrals South doors lead to beautiful 15/16th Century cloisters
Web Link

Bath                    The Romans built a city here and called it Aquae Sulis.  It grew up around the Baths establishment, one of the foremost of its kind in the Western empire.  Its remains form an impressive monument to Roman Britain.  In the 18th Century Bath became a fashionable resort for society presided over by Beau Nash.  It was at this time that the work of providing a suitable environment began.  From the early 1700s - to the early 1800s many beautiful buildings, streets, squares and crescents were completed.  The pump room in 1795 and the only bridge left in England built with shops, Pulteney Bridge completed in 1777 by William Pulteney.  The city abounds with acres of parks and gardens which sets off the formality of the Georgian architecture.  The town name means bath, it is not Roman but a pure English word.  The Romans did originally call the area Aquae Calidae (hot waters) then Aquae Sulis (waters of sulis, referring to their pagan god) the Anglo-Saxon name was Akemanchester, which is generally regarded as being derived from the latin Aquae (ake) and the Roman road of Akeman Street which ran via Bath.  Also the old English word Ceaster meaning Roman Fort.
Web Link

Web Link to Roman Baths

Bath Abbey        A Saxon Abbey first stood on this site followed by a Norman one.  It was not until 1499 that a Gothic Church was erected.  Progress was very slow and by the dissolution only the choir and the walls had been completed.  However the west front had certainly been given its famous turrets and ladders.  After the dissolution the Abbey was looted and the church was given to the parish.  The building was soon enclosed by houses and the North aisle became a walk through for towns people.  In 1864 a new rector Charles Kemble at his own expense began a reconstruction of the building.  Hence what we see today is a Victorian replica of the original Tudor designs.
Web Link

Glastonbury      It is believed by many people that under the waters of a spring on the slopes of its Tor Joseph of Arimathea buried the chalice used at the last supper.  That when on a nearby hill, he thrust his thorn staff into the ground it took root to produce the distinctive Glastonbury Winter flowering thorn tree, and that, on what was later to be the site of the great Abbey round which the town grew, he built  a church of daub and wattle.  Briefly this is the legend which has drawn pilgrims to this place for centuries.  In 688, King Ine of Wessex gave it a Monastery, majestic, rich and the most beautiful in Britain which is clear from the ruins of the church.  It is also believed that King Alfred and Queen Guinevere were re-buried in the Abbey.  In the town St Johns church is a fine 15th Century example.  The George Inn was built in the 15th Century to lodge pilgrims and the handsome market cross is 19th Century.
Web Link to Glastonbury Abbey
Web Link to Glastonbury Town

Welsh Folk Museum    Wales through the centuries at this remarkable museum, an experience around every corner.  From a Celtic village of 2,000 years ago to a miners cottage of the 1980s.  A Welsh Victorian school, farm, bakers, grocery store. original buildings brought back to life.  Formal gardens and landscaped grounds, wooded walks, pools and ponds giving a special insight into the daily life of the people of Wales, how they lived, worked and spent their leisure time
Web Link

St. Davids                        This tiny City (Britain’s smallest) grew up around the religious settlement founded by St David, (patron saint of Wales ) in the 6th Century.  It is situated on St Davids peninsula, a Celtic place of pilgrimage and peace, a granite ledge of land jutting out into the Atlantic ocean.  A truly magical place of inspiring beauty with golden beaches, stunning coastline, nature and wildlife in abundance.  Over the centuries, an important place situated as it is en route to Ireland.  Many are said to have passed this way, King Arthur landed on St Davids shores, Black Bart, creator of the Jolly Roger embarked on piracy from nearby Solva Harbour and pilgrims in their thousands have trodden the ancient roads.
Web Link

St. Davids Cathedral                                St Davids Cathedral almost hidden from view in a valley at the far West of the city occupies a site of a religious settlement founded by St David in the 6th Century.  Tradition also has it that he was born here.  His mother, so the story goes, gave birth to him on the spot on the cliffs to the South of the Cathedral now marked by the ruins of St Nons chapel.  The Cathedral with its wonderful oak roof dates back to the 12th Century (circa 1181-82), for centuries it was a place of pilgrimage, (two visits to St Davids being equal to one visit to Rome).  Next to the Cathedral are the remains of the ruined Bishops Palace, how splendid this must have looked in its prime.  Uniquely the sovereign of the United Kingdom is a member of the chapter and therefore has his/her own royal stall.
Web Link

Bishops Palace St Davids  Situated adjacent to the Cathedral at St. Davids the ruins of this magnificent palace bear testament to the influence and wealth created by the church in mediaeval times.  Most of the construction was overseen by Bishop Henry De Gower in the mid 14th Century.  He spared no expense on creating this lavish residence.  Originally built with two sets of state rooms set around a courtyard.  He used one set for private business and the other for the ceremonial entertaining.  The palace fell into disrepair in the 16th Century.  It is said the then bishop stripped the lead from the roof to pay for his five daughters dowries.
Web Link

Pembroke Castle           Built in your dreams, Hollywood could not have built a better example of a Norman castle.  Started in 1189 the inner ward consisted of walls and a massive round keep 75ft high and 50ft in diameter.  Five floors beneath a stone dome, the walls at the base being over 19ft thick.  Thought to have been built by William Marshal Earl of Pembroke in about 1200.  The walls of the outer ward date back to the 13th Century.  A castle with a tremendous history and a major claim to fame.  The Birthplace of the Tudor dynasty.  You need no reminder of Henry VIII or Elizabeth I.  The Henry VII tower is believed to house the room where a baby was born in 1456 to a young 15yr old girl Margaret Beaufort wife of Edmund Earl of Richmond, older brother of Jasper Tewdwr Earl of Pembroke.  This young infant became Henry Tewdwr (Tudor) went on to become Earl of Richmond after his father died, then defeated Richard III at Bosworth Field and by right of battle rather than right of descent became King Henry VII of England first sovereign of the Tudor dynasty.  His son eventually became Henry VIII and his granddaughter Elizabeth I.
Web Link

Cardiff                                The capital city of Wales boasts a castle with 1,900 years of history first built by the Romans, some of the 10ft thick walls still remain.  The Normans came and built their castle which has been in continuous occupation ever since.  Some of the area surrounding the castle is now occupied by a superb modern shopping centre.  Hundreds of acres of parkland situated right in the city centre, museums, the civic centre, University of Wales. St Davids Hall, a 2,000 seat concert and conference centre.  To take the city into the millennium the new Cardiff Bay project, a redevelopment of the old Cardiff docks area.
Web Link

Lacock Abbey and Village            The old English word "Lacuc" means small stream.  Recorded in the mid Ninth century as "Lacok".  A small tributary to the River Avon runs close by. 
The village with its twisted streets, gabled roofs and timber buildings is one of the prettiest in England.  Most buildings span the centuries, medieval to 18th Century.  The local church of St Cyriac with a fine perpendicular roof dates back to 1450 although early records do indicate a monastic building on this site in 850AD.
The abbey was founded by Ela Countess of Salisbury in 1229.  She became the Abbess and served for 17 years.  In the 17th Century the Abbey passed to the Talbot family under very romantic circumstances.
Olive a Daughter of the house was locked up by her father so she would not continue with an affair with a Talbot.  Olive leapt from the Abbey into her lovers arms, nearly killing him in the process.  Both in fact were saved by the petticoats that Olive wore.  As she fell they billowed out so breaking her fall.  By her courage and devotion to a Talbot her father let her marry and the Abbey and Village remained in the Talbot family until 1944 when Miss Matilda Talbot gave everything to the national trust.
Web Link

Salisbury                       A town where there is no need to go looking for interests in dark corners, it is all around.  The city dates back to the 13th Century when it was decided to move the Bishops seat  from Old Sarum.  The Cathedral foundations were begun in 1220 and the city started to grow.  Salisbury was built on a grid or chequer system which left space between the blocks.  Cathedral Close is the most beautiful in all England and the list of buildings with interest is unending.  It is interesting to note that the main wall around the Cathedral Close was granted by license from Edward III.
Web Link

Salisbury Cathedral          The first sight of the Cathedral is most impressive an early example of English architecture.  Its spire soaring to a height of 404ft the highest in England which imposes almost 6,000 tons of stone on the four pillars of the crossing.  The Nave measures 198ft with a clear uncluttered beauty, little having changed since it was built.  With Foundations no more than 4 feet deep on a bed of gravel, the main building was begun in 1220 and completed in 1258.  The Cloisters and Chapter house being finished in 1280.  It was never a Monastic institution but staffed with Secular Clergy called Canons.  This arrangements continues today.  Canons would be away in their parishes for most of the year, just coming back to the Cathedral for short periods of time.  The present houses round the close are built on the sites of the former Canons' Houses.
Web Link

The Cotswolds               Developed from the Anglo Saxon words Cot and Wold, Cot meaning sheep pen. Wold meaning high windy ground, that certainly can describe the area well, especially in the winter.  The soil is poor on the Wolds and not a lot of it but a great area for rearing sheep.  Hence the numerous villages with lovely churches (known as wool churches) built by wealthy landowners centuries ago.  The area is also famous for the Cotswold stone a soft stone which yellows with age.  Many cottages will be seen built of Cotswold stone.
Web Link

Cotswold Images

Cirencester                    The Capital of Dobuni when as Corinium Dobunorum in 43A.D. it became one of the chief Roman administration centres for South West of England.  In the 4th Century with the withdrawal of the Romans the town went into decline until an Anglo Saxon town was built.  It slowly regained its importance with the development of sheep rearing on the rich Cotswold meadow lands.  The wealth from the wool trade was tremendous, so much so that the merchants of the town were able to build one of the greatest wool churches in the town.  The 15th Century St John the Baptist Church with its superb tower and three storied fan vaulted porch.  It has been judged one of the most beautiful perpendicular churches in England.
Web Link

Bibury                             Best seen in the fading light of a warm summer evening, the houses of golden stone many with cottage gardens facing the River Coln.  William Morris described Bibury as the most beautiful village in England.  Sit on the wall by the river watch the trout running in the crystal clear water and across on the island a protected nature reserve with wild duck and many species of bird.
Web Link

Burford                           Can certainly lay claim to being one of the most beautiful Cotswold towns.  A superb High Street slopes gently down to a three arch bridge spanning the River Windrush.  Some of the buildings such as the Bear Inn, Crown Inn and the Grammer School can readily identify their roots in the 15th Century.  A fine church exists, St John, hidden from view down a lane at the foot of the High Street.  A wonderful mixture of accretion (add on's as and when money became available or persons so decided) the tower is definitely Norman so is the West Doorway.  The Guild of Merchants chapel circa 1200 but remodelled in the 15th Century.  In May 1649 Cromwell imprisoned a group of mutineers in the church for 3 nights after which they were to be shot.  When three had been executed Cromwell relented, one of the group “Sedley” scratched his name on the font.  In even earlier times the Anglo Saxons defeated the Mercians at the battle of Edge now a playing field near the church.  It is also written that in 683 a council was convened at Burford attended by the King of Mercia at which the date of Easter was fixed for the English church.  The wealth of the region coming from the surrounding sheep country during the middle ages.  To really appreciate Burford take time to walk the High Street.
Web Link