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Gloucester Cathedral                    The present Cathedral was started in about 1089 by a monk called Serlo from Mont St Michael in France.  The building was consecrated in 1100 though work did continue for some years to come.  The great East window is the largest Medieval window in Europe.  A central tower was built approx 1450 to replace the Norman one.  The tower stands 225 feet high and is one of the glories of Gloucester, seen for miles around.  The first appearance is of a Gothic Cathedral, but further close inspection will reveal its Norman structure.  The cloisters are amongst the finest in England and are the earliest fan vaulted cloister still in existence.  They were built in the 14th Century and contain a magnificent lavatorium in the North range and study carrels in the South range.  The Kings school is very much a part of the foundation, where the Cathedral Choristers are educated.  Music is very much a part of the tradition of Gloucester and is the venue every 3 years for the three choirs festival.
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Tewkesbury Abbey                        Their is evidence that Monks were settled in the town by 715 and built a small church in the meadows by the river.  The present Abbey is Norman built between 1090 & 1121 by Robert Fitzhamon a kinsman of William the Conqueror.  The Abbey prospered for over 400 years before being handed over to King Henry VIII in 1540.  The townspeople to their horror, about to see their abbey being destroyed rallied round and raised the enormous sum (16th Century standards ) of 453 to purchase the church for their own use.  The Abbey's tower is the largest and finest surviving Norman central tower anywhere in the world, 46 feet square and 148 feet high.  The West front is dominated by the Great Norman recessed arch 65 feet high.  The massive wooded doors of the North porch are almost certainly the original circa 1121.  It is the second largest parish church in England.  The Abbey is 311 feet East to West, it is held up by 14 great Norman columns, which are the tallest in England, 31 feet high and 6 feet in diameter.  The 7 choir windows contain the original 14th century glass, in the centre of the choir is a brass plate which marks the burial place of Edward of Lancaster, Prince of Wales, who was killed at the Battle of Tewkesbury.  The chapels around the Abbey celebrate some of the families who have been associated with it during its long and somewhat turbulent history.
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Christchurch, Oxford                     Quite unique, a Cathedral serving the Diocese of Oxford and a College Chapel serving Christ Church College.  It was made a Cathedral by King Henry VIII in 1545 after cardinal Wolsey had made it a Chapel of the College in 1525.  The building however dates back to the 12th Century when it was a priory of Augustianain Cannons.  The first recorded church on the site was in the 8th Century.  The spire incidentally, constructed during the 13th Century was the first in England the lovely Gothic chancel added in the year 1500.  A superb collection of stained glass windows still exists dating back the 14th Century with the oldest being the magnificent Becket window in the South transept (a rare example of 14th Century glass in situ).
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St. Mary the Virgin, Oxford           
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St. John the Baptist Church, Cirencester    One of the oldest Parish Churches in England and has been used as a place of worship for over a thousand years.
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St. Mary's Church, Prestbury      

St. John Church, Burford