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Chichester Cathedral    The main building began in about 1076 under the leadership of Bishop Stigand and continued under Bishop Ralph De Luffa.  A fire in 1114 hindered progress but most of what we see today existed by 1123.  The Cloisters were built in approx. 1400, followed by the seven light window in the North Transept.  The Chapter House was also completed at about this time.  The detached bell tower was built during the early part of the 15th Century and while many Cathedrals once had such a building, only the one at Chichester remains today.  It was built to take the weight of the eight massive bells from the Central Tower.  The spire and The Arundel Screen are also 15th Century.  The original Arundel Screen was removed in 1859 and this possibly precipitated the collapse of the tower in 1861.  In 1961 it was restored to its original position as we see it today.  The Prebendal School where the Choristers are educated stands alongside the Cathedral and is the oldest school in Sussex and was originally endowed by Edward Storey, Bishop in 1478.  The vicars hall bordering South Street is Circa 15th Century.  The 12th Century Undercroft is now the restaurant.  The Vicars' Close also early 15th Century.  The Deanery was built in 1725 and the gateway at the end of Canon Lane leading to the Bishops Palace is Circa 1327.  The Palace just South of the Cathedral contains a lovely 12th Century Chapel.  The gardens and serenity of this Cathedral is a joy to behold.
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Portsmouth Cathedral     
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Romsey Abbey                   The Abbey dates back to the start of the 10th century.  Anglo-Saxon foundations have in fact been discovered. (a trapdoor exists to access the remains from the church).  The main building however does date back to the 12th Century built by Henry de Blois, Bishop of Winchester.  The church was actually sold to the town for 100 during the dissolution.  With the exception of the West front the Abbey is entirely 12th Century.  The Norman nave is over 250ft long and soars to a height of over 70ft.  Some very interesting items are to be seen within the walls, especially at the rear of the altar in the South choir aisle, where you can see a small Anglo-Saxon rood showing Christ with angels and soldiers.  Also on the West wall of the South transept hangs a crucifixion with the hand of god reaching down, it is verified that this also dates back to Anglo-Saxon times.  A delightful Abbey which cannot fail to inspire and enthuse one.
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Salisbury Cathedral          The first sight of the Cathedral is most impressive an early example of English architecture.  Its spire soaring to a height of 404ft the highest in England which imposes almost 6,000 tons of stone on the four pillars of the crossing.  The Nave measures 198ft with a clear uncluttered beauty, little having changed since it was built.  With Foundations no more than 4 feet deep on a bed of gravel, the main building was begun in 1220 and completed in 1258.  The Cloisters and Chapter house being finished in 1280.  It was never a Monastic institution but staffed with Secular Clergy called Canons.  This arrangements continues today.  Canons would be away in their parishes for most of the year, just coming back to the Cathedral for short periods of time.  The present houses round the close are built on the sites of the former Canons' Houses.
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Wimborne Minster            
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Winchester Cathedral     The building was started in 1079 and consecrated in 1093.  Work from this period can still be seen in the crypt, transepts and East part of the cloister.  Between 1189 and 1204 the Lady Chapel was built and the Quire extended.  It is the longest Medieval Cathedral in Europe (556ft)  In 1110 the central tower collapsed and was rebuilt with the supporting piers greatly strengthened (they are now 20ft in width). Among its treasures is the Great Winchester Bible, dating back to the 12th Century.  This illuminated copy was written in the scriptorium at Winchester and is now preserved in the Cathedral library.
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