Christ Church, ILL
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Christ Church Winnetka, Illinois
Choir Leader Richard Clemmitt

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Lacock Abbey and Village    The old English word "Lacuc" means small stream.  Was recorded in the mid 9th Century as "Lacok".  A small tributary to the River Avon runs close by.  The village with its twisted streets, gabled roofs and timber buildings is one of the prettiest in England.  Most buildings span the centuries Medieval to 18th Century.  The local church of St Cyriac with a fine perpendicular roof.  The Abbey was founded by Ela Countess of Salisbury in 1229, she became the Abbess and served for 17 years.  In the 17th Century the Abbey passed to the Talbot family under very romantic circumstances.  Olive a daughter of the house was locked up by her father so she would not continue with an affair with a Talbot.  Olive leapt from the Abbey into her lovers arms, nearly killing him in the process.  Both in fact were saved by the petticoats that Olive wore, as she fell they billowed out so breaking her fall.  By her courage and devotion to a Talbot her father let her marry and the Abbey and village remained in the Talbot family until 1944 when Miss Matilda Talbot gave everything to the national trust.
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Blenheim Palace          The home of the present 11th Duke of Marlbrough.  The first Duke John Spencer gave battle to the Frence and Bavarian forces at the village of Blenheim in 1704.  He took a force of 50,000 men on a 600 mile march to the Danube were the enemy was waiting in a strong position.  By tactical brilliance and by the personal inspiration he gave his troops, he achieved a great victory.  When he returned to England he was created a Duke and granted the Royal Manor of Woodstock with a promise that a sumptuous palace should be paid for by a grateful country.  The architect of Blenheim Palace was John Vanbrugh who worked with Nicholas Hawksmoor on both Blenheim and Castle Howard in Yorkshire.  Marlborough went on to other famous victories at Ramillies, Oudenarde and Malplaquet.  The Palace was built between 1705 & 1722, it is set in over 2,000 acres of parkland (landscaped by Capability Brown) Blenhalm Palace is the birthplace of Sir Winstone Churchill who was born here on the 30th November 1874.
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The Cotswolds               Developed from the Anglo Saxon words Cot and Wold, Cot meaning sheep pen. Wold meaning high windy ground, that certainly can describe the area well, especially in the winter.  The soil is poor on the Wolds and not a lot of it but a great area for rearing sheep.  Hence the numerous villages with lovely churches (known as wool churches) built by wealthy landowners centuries ago.  The area is also famous for the Cotswold stone a soft stone which yellows with age.  Many cottages will be seen built of Cotswold stone.
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Cotswold Images

Burford                           Can certainly lay claim to being one of the most beautiful Cotswold towns.  A superb High Street slopes gently down to a three arch bridge spanning the River Windrush.  Some of the buildings such as the Bear Inn, Crown Inn and the Grammer School can readily identify their roots in the 15th Century.  A fine church exists, St John, hidden from view down a lane at the foot of the High Street.  A wonderful mixture of accretion (add on's as and when money became available or persons so decided) the tower is definitely Norman so is the West Doorway.  The Guild of Merchants chapel circa 1200 but remodelled in the 15th Century.  In May 1649 Cromwell imprisoned a group of mutineers in the church for 3 nights after which they were to be shot.  When three had been executed Cromwell relented, one of the group “Sedley” scratched his name on the font.  In even earlier times the Anglo Saxons defeated the Mercians at the battle of Edge now a playing field near the church.  It is also written that in 683 a council was convened at Burford attended by the King of Mercia at which the date of Easter was fixed for the English church.  The wealth of the region coming from the surrounding sheep country during the middle ages.  To really appreciate Burford take time to walk the High Street.
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Gloucester                      Began life as a Roman fort which guarded the lowest Severn crossing and the legions route into Wales (Glevum).  The city later became the residence of Norman Kings, while here William the Conqueror decided on the Doomsday survey.  The city has long been an inland port with its own harbour master.  Famous for its Cathedral it has also been the focal point of other important historic occurrences.  The city's main thoroughfares still follow the Roman roads and meet at the Cross.  In Brunswick Street is a memorial to Robert Raikes who founded the Sunday School movement in nearby St Catherine Street.  The New Inn in Northgate Street was a half timbered 15th Century pilgrims hostelry.  The Ravern Tavern in Hare Lane, once the home of the Hoare Family who sailed in the mayflower to New England.
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Gloucester Cathedral                    The present Cathedral was started in about 1089 by a monk called Serlo from Mont St Michael in France.  The building was consecrated in 1100 though work did continue for some years to come.  The great East window is the largest Medieval window in Europe.  A central tower was built approx 1450 to replace the Norman one.  The tower stands 225 feet high and is one of the glories of Gloucester, seen for miles around.  The first appearance is of a Gothic Cathedral, but further close inspection will reveal its Norman structure.  The cloisters are amongst the finest in England and are the earliest fan vaulted cloister still in existence.  They were built in the 14th Century and contain a magnificent lavatorium in the North range and study carrels in the South range.  The Kings school is very much a part of the foundation, where the Cathedral Choristers are educated.  Music is very much a part of the tradition of Gloucester and is the venue every 3 years for the three choirs festival.
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The Warehouse - Indoor Climbing Centre    Gloucestershires only indoor climbing centre.  Offering climbing for young and old with any ability, walls up to 13metres high and state of the art climbing technologies promise a great day out for the whole family.  Now also offering Indoor Caving in their custom built 100m long caving complex.
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Berkeley Castle            Built over 800 years ago and still the ancestral home of the Berkeley family who still live there, the family, of course, have close associations with Berkeley U.S.A.  The oldest castle in Britain to have been continuously lived in by the same family.  Built as a fortress and used as a home, during its chequered history it has been the scene of sieges during the civil war and terrible deeds.  Its walls in some places over 14 feet thick, turrets and towers stand majestic.  This was the scene in 1327 of the frightful murder of Edward II, he was imprisoned in a cell close to the castle dungeon, a deep pit into which rotting carcasses and half alive prisoners were thrown.  It was anticipated the stench and filth from the dungeon would overpower the prisoner in the cell.  However Edward survived for 5 months and ended up being tortured to death by his jailers.  The castle is also the site of the great hall where the West Country Barons met before setting off to meet King John for the signing of Magna Carta in 1215.  Small but a real example of how we think a castle should look.
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Winchester                    The historic city of Winchester has been welcoming groups for centuries, ever since the first pilgrims visited the shrine of St Swithun.  Already an important town in Roman times, it became the capital under the Anglo Saxons, and in Alfreds time 871-901 was a great centre of learning.  William the Conqueror kept Winchester as his capital and as late as the 17th Century Charles II planned a palace here.  The city is rich in important buildings, one such building is the Great Hall, completed in 1235 it is a magnificent example of 13th Century domestic architecture.  It is now an Assize Court. Sir Walter Raleigh was condemned to death here in 1603 and on the wall hangs what is called King Arthur's Round Table, marked out and inscribed for his knights.  However one building stands out above all others, the cathedral.
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Winchester Cathedral     The building was started in 1079 and consecrated in 1093.  Work from this period can still be seen in the crypt, transepts and east part of the cloister.  Between 1189 and 1204 the lady chapel was built and the choir extended.  It is the longest Medieval Cathedral in Europe (556ft) in 1110 the central tower collapsed and was rebuilt with the supporting piers greatly strengthened (they are now 20ft in width). Among its treasures is the Great Winchester Bible dating back to the 12th Century, this illuminated copy was written in the scriptorium at Winchester and is now preserved in the Cathedral library.
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Beaulieu                    Originally a 13th Century Cistercian Abbey, the stately home grew up round the gatehouse and became the home of the Lords of Beaulieu.  Today a very popular attraction which encompasses the ruins of the Abbey, the house, gardens and the national motor museum of over 250 cars.  Take advantage of some fun things such as go-karts, fast trax (motor racing simulator) and miniature motors.
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Portsmouth Royal Naval Museum     The historic dockyard is home to great ships, such as HMS Victory, Lord Nelson's Flagship from the battle of Trafalgar. HMS Warrior (1860) the worlds first iron-hulled, armoured warship powered by steam, still afloat in Portsmouth harbour.  Also the Mary Rose, one of the most famous ships in the world, built in 1510 and capsized and sank dramatically in an accident in 1545.  This great ship was raised again in 1982 and has undergone extensive preservation work ever since, with the new museum opening in Spring 2013.  The Dockyard also houses the Royal Navy Museum and many other attractions.
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Web Link to the Mary Rose

Fishbourne Roman Villa            The site of one of the largest non military Roman buildings yet discovered in Britain. Foundations came to light in 1960 when a new water main was being laid for a housing estate.  Excavations uncovered a luxuriously fitted villa with over 100 rooms, it is thought to have been built between 75AD – 100AD for King Cogidubnus leader of the Atrebate tribe. He co-operated with the Romans and his reward a magnificent palace.
The building was occupied between the 1st and 3rd Centuries. The main buildings were thought to have been destroyed by fire around 320AD. You can see sections of walls, plumbing and heating systems together with over 25 different floor mosaics.
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Arundel                    A pleasant town on the River Arun.  A lovely high street with a nice selection of shops and old houses.  The town is dominated of course by the castle.  But does have two Churches. St Nicholas rebuilt in 1380 after the black death.  Although a Anglican Church, one end of it is the Fitzalan Chapel where the family hold Roman Catholic services.  The two areas divided by a Sussex iron screen.  During the English Civil War Parliamentarian forces bombarded the castle using cannon fired from the Church tower hence most of the castle Norman fortifications where destroyed.  The other fine church is the Roman Catholic Cathedral of St Philip Howard built in 1870.  It became a Cathedral in 1965.  There has been a settlement here since pre-roman times.  The town was strategically important due to its location crossing the river on the main east west road route through Sussex.  Arundel: has its origins in the French word Hirondelle meaning Swallow.  A Swallow is depicted in the towns Coat of Arms.
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Arundel castle       A castle has stood on this site since before William the Conqueror came in 1066.  However the oldest parts of the existing building are probably Norman dating back to the time of Roger De Montgomery one of Williams favourite knights.  The castle underwent several sieges and was extensively damaged by Parliamentarian forces during he Civil War.  After which it fell into a very dilapidated state being restored in the 18th Century and again in the 19th Century when a further two towers where added by the then 15th Duke.  It has been the home of the Fitzalen family for more than 500 years.  Earls of Arundel and through female descent the Howards (Dukes of Norfolk) the premier peers and hereditary Earls Marshal of England.  Despite religious persecution the family has remained Roman Catholic.  The interior contains some fine rooms especially the Barons Hall, the library 117ft long and 35ft wide and constructed entirely in mahogany, plus a Victorian room especially designed for the visit of Victoria and Albert in 1846.  Hanging from the walls art treasures including, Van Dyck, Gainsborough, Holbein, Constable and Reynolds, together with fine tapestries and furniture collected by the family over many centuries.  The castle is surrounded by 1,000 acres of parkland and sits majestically overlooking the surrounding landscape in similar fashion to that other great castle at Windsor.
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Chichester                   An ancient city dating back to 43AD when the Romans landed nearby and established a base here.  Evidence of their occupation can be seen in the remains of the defensive walls, They also built a Palace at nearby Fishbourne, one of the largest Roman buildings uncovered in Britain.  When the Romans left, the Saxons established a settlement here and the area continued to be quite peaceful and prosperous.  The present City lay out follows the original Roman plan of walls and roads.  North, South, East & West Streets crossing at the 16th Century Butter Cross.  Many fine Georgian houses exist especially in a delightful street called Little London and the flat landscape makes it a fine and very easy place to explore divided up as it is into four quadrants separated by the main thoroughfares. 
The Romans called this place Noviomagnus meaning new market from the two Celtic words Novus meaning "new" and Magus meaning "plain".  When the Saxons came, Aella, first King of the Southern Saxons, gave the word Ceaster meaning "Roman town" to his eldest son, Cissa.  Hence we have “Cissa`s Ceaster”.  By 895 the settlement was recorded as “Cisseceastre”
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Chichester Cathedral    The main building began in about 1076 under the leadership of Bishop Stigand and continued under Bishop Ralph De Luffa.  A fire in 1114 hindered progress but most of what we see today existed by 1123.  The Cloisters were built in approx. 1400, followed by the seven light window in the North Transept.  The Chapter House was also completed at about this time.  The detached bell tower was built during the early part of the 15th Century and while many Cathedrals once had such a building, only the one at Chichester remains today.  It was built to take the weight of the eight massive bells from the Central Tower.  The spire and The Arundel Screen are also 15th Century.  The original Arundel Screen was removed in 1859 and this possibly precipitated the collapse of the tower in 1861.  In 1961 it was restored to its original position as we see it today.  The Prebendal School where the Choristers are educated stands alongside the Cathedral and is the oldest school in Sussex and was originally endowed by Edward Storey, Bishop in 1478.  The vicars hall bordering South Street is Circa 15th Century.  The 12th Century Undercroft is now the restaurant.  The Vicars' Close also early 15th Century.  The Deanery was built in 1725 and the gateway at the end of Canon Lane leading to the Bishops Palace is Circa 1327.  The Palace just South of the Cathedral contains a lovely 12th Century Chapel.  The gardens and serenity of this Cathedral is a joy to behold.
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